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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
.s. consulates and embassies. da mass caucuses syria, kabul, afghanistan, tunisia, yemen, turkey. the one that is most important is benghazi, libya. go ahead. >> right. not and the fact that it was attacked and our ambassador was shuttered and three other americans but the fact that it happened with warning on september 11th. that is like being surprised when christmas falls on christmas day. we were completely flat footed. not expecting it. 8 attacks on american embassies with americans dead. that is an absolute abysmal failure of secretary clinton and you didn't mention in the list that could go on and on the fact that our relationship with our one democratic ally in the middle east israel is deteriorating. opinion about america in every country except japan has deteriorated since 2009. headed in the wrong direction. there was no reset with russia. in fact, it is worse than ever. >> mark, what will secretary clinton's legacy be? >> i think the personal legacy will be phenomenal. no national politician of either the republican or democratic party that enjoys over 70% national approval ra
as a difficult, the evolving situation in north africa, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this devolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask for unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i made on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members provide questions for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as possible. i want to thank you and your family for being here and i wish you well. and you and the hearing is adjourned. >> thank you, chairwoman. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> on c-span today, "washington journal" is next live with your phone calls. later, live coverage of the farewell ceremony for out coming -- outgoing defense
... could've had a v8. >>> in tunisia right now, shock and angry protests after an outspoken opposition leader is gunned down. kate's here, she's got that and more of the top stories, kate? >> another story that's really troubling. a popular public figure and critic of tunisia's islamic-led government was according to an eyewitness, shot and killed as he left for work this morning. outraged protesters filled the streets and there were violent clashes with police. tunisia's prime minister condemned the assassination, saying the real target is, in his words, quote, the tunisian revolution as a whole. >>> also in germany, germany's education minister has been stripped of her ph.d in an embarrassing case of plagiarism, if you can even believe it, and she's the second minister in chancellor angela merkel's cabinet to face these allegations. the university awarded the minister the highest honors for her doctoral thesis, which one says has many plagiarized passages. >>> and just days after king richard iii's remains were identified underneath a parking lot in england, a battle is shaping up. w
future attacks being planned by the same people because we never got a chance to talk to him. tunisia said their laws would not let them hold him. that is an excuse we've heard in other pats of the world. that doesn't concern you? >> we press our partners in foreign government to hold individuals and to allow us access to it. sometimes their laws do not allow that to happen. i think the united states government has to respect these governments right to, in fact, enforce their laws appropriately. we don't want to have these individuals being held in some kind of custody that is extra judicial. >> thank you. >> senator warner. >> thank you. thank you mr. brennan, for your testimony today. i think what we've heard from a number of colleagues and we had this discussion when we discussed the committee study. how could be confirmed -- i'm-- how do you ensure that the c.i.a. director is going to be well-informed. particularly to -- we have questioned you about a number of key sensitive programs. the agency is in a lot of these programs that there needs to be some ability to measure objective
they did. he is still in tunisia. it shows the two nations are working with the rule of law, just like we do. >> we have someone who is a suspect in the potential attack on benghazi and did not give us access to him, and we don't have any information. >> we work with our partners across the board. when they can detain individuals according to their laws, we were to see if we have the ability to ask some questions, sometimes directly and sometimes indirectly. >> but the tunisian law did not allow them to hold them so they let them go? >> and we did not have anything on him, either. if we did, we would have made the point for them to turn them over to us. the cia should be able to lend its full expertise as it does right now in terms of and support a military interrogations', fbi, and foreign partner of the briefings. they do that on a regular basis. >> what is the best setting? a suspected terrorist is captured and we think we can obtain information from them, where the suggest they be taken? what is the right setting? >> there are many options. sometimes with foreign partners, they put th
in detail to what i perceive as a difficult, the evolving situation in north africa, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this devolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i may, on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members to the right questions for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as we i want to thank you and your family for being here. i wish you well. thank you and the hearing is adjourned. >> thank you. >> john brennan has the counterterrorism advisory for your years and now nominate background the president to be the c.i.a. director. we're wrapping up four hours of testimony. we're opening up the phone lines to find out about the issues discussed and
concerning nuclear weapons. libya is obvious, mali, egypt in a state of unrest, now tunisia. we're probably the more unsettled. since the end of the cold war they certainly have ever seen. would you agree with that assessment? >> i absolutely agree. >> meanwhile, signal we send to the radiant is don't worry this aircraft carrier is not coming. this is really a disconnect, the likes of which i have never seen before. now i want to talk about the sequestration because senator graham, senator ayotte and i traveled around warning about the effects of sequestration. we went to a lot of places where men and women in the military say how can we possibly do this, cause this uncertainty in the lives of the men and women who are serving? latest being cancellation of deployment of the aircraft carrier? meanwhile, the president of the united states that it won't happen. during the campaign, won't happen. we're worried for a long time that it was going to happen in this disgraceful to treat the men and women in the military, who we all speak with such advocacy and passion on their behalf to be subject i
concerning nuclear weapons, libya, mali, tunisia and egypt are in various states of unrest which we have no strategy. we are the most unsettled period since the end of the cold war. i have serious concerns as to the quality of senator hagel's professional judgment in the acuity of his views on critical areas of national security including security in the east asia and the middle east. his record on iraq is particularly troubling. as i alluded a moment ago in 2002 he voted to authorize the use of force against iraq. by 2006, the support for the war diminished after republican losses in the 2006 midterm elections. he wrote an opinion piece for "the washington post" under the title "leaving iraq honorable "foreforeshadowing. and president bush announced the decision to surge troops in 2007, senator hagel actively campaigned against it. he voted in february of 2007, in favor of a bill expressing opposition to the surge and in favor of measures to troops from iraq and equally bad policy. he wrote in the 2008 memoir, america our next chapter in historically show that the legislative efforts to
, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this devolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask for unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i made on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members provide questions fear for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as possible. hot so you can respond to them tuesday. i want to thank you and your family for being here. and i wish you well. thank you, and the hearing is adjourned. >> taking madam chairman. -- thank you madam chairman. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> now live coverage as we go to the state department with the new secretary of state john kerry will speak and hold a join
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)